How August 26 became “Women’s Equality Day”

Each year since 1973, August 26th has been officially recognized as “Women’s Equality Day.” It’s a commemoration of the final approval of the Nineteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. That amendment, which guaranteed women the right to vote in all local, state and national elections, says: “The right of citizens of the United States to … Read more

“I am not a crook!”

In retrospect, it’s ironic that one of the slogans used by Richard M. Nixon during his first presidential campaign in 1968 was: “The ‘I’ in Nixon stands for integrity.” Today, the more remembered “slogan” is the one used against Nixon during the 1972 presidential election, a quip attributed to comedian Mort Sahl: “Would you buy … Read more

The origins of the Cold War term “hot line” and the mythical “red phones”…

Many books and websites note that the famed “hot line” communication link between the Pentagon and the Kremlin was established on August 30, 1963. Press reports about this new tool, intended to provide a possible way to avoid a nuclear war between the United States and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR), soon cemented … Read more

Spiro Agnew vs. the “effete intellectuals” and “nattering nabobs”…

Nowadays, Conservative provocateurs like Donald Trump, Rush Limbaugh and Ann Coulter get lots of media attention for coming up with snarky, quotable insults aimed at Liberals. But the way was paved for them decades ago by Republican politician Spiro Agnew (1918-1996), the former Governor of Maryland who became Vice President of the United States under … Read more

“Our long national nightmare is over.”

In August of 1974, faced with Congressional hearings, a mountain of bad press and the looming threat of impeachment over the Watergate scandal, Richard Nixon became the first president in U.S. history to resign. His official letter of resignation was delivered at 11:35 a.m. Eastern Time on August 9, 1974. A half-hour later, Nixon’s Vice … Read more

The infamous quote that revealed Earl was a bigoted Butz-hole…

Lest we forget, some politically incorrect remarks got a lot of press attention long before Donald Trump started using Twitter. In 1975, John Dean, former White House Counsel to President Richard Nixon, served a short prison sentence for his role in the Watergate cover-up scandal. After his release, Dean started a new career as a … Read more

“Our long national nightmare is over.”

In August of 1974, faced with Congressional hearings, a mountain of bad press and the looming threat of impeachment over the Watergate scandal, Richard Nixon became the first president in U.S. history to resign. His official letter of resignation was delivered at 11:35 a.m. Eastern Time on August 9, 1974. A half-hour later, Nixon’s Vice … Read more

Is Nixon’s November 7, 1962 rant a “teachable moment”?

Long before dogged news coverage of the Watergate scandal helped force Richard M. Nixon to resign as President in 1974, he disliked the press. In fact, throughout his long political career, Nixon felt the media generally had a liberal bias and an unfairly negative attitude toward him. He disliked the way the press failed to … Read more